Phantom Limb Pain

I read the article “The Civil War Doctor Who Proved Phantom Limb Pain Was Real” by Alicia Puglionesi. It was really interesting to me, because my major and career is in healthcare. Apparently, it was safer to just perform limb amputations, so there were a lot of veterans with amputated limbs (the article says three minutes!!) before and after the Civil War. The article follows Dr. Mitchell, who sought to treat veterans for phantom limb pain and the struggles he faced in trying to do so, especially since doctors at the time believed what they had physical evidence of, and nerve pain is not something so easily ‘seen’. I though this article was very interesting, and it seemed to tie in well with what we’re learning about now. Also, I was wondering if Louisa May Alcott who wrote about phantom limb pain was related to the Alcott in the novel we are reading for class. Both rely heavily on religion it seems, so I’d be interested to know!

 

http://www.history.com/news/the-civil-war-doctor-who-proved-phantom-limb-pain-was-real

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“Disease”

We’ve had a lot of reading about slavery in this class that have explained how people tried to justify enslaving people.  It’s always shocking to learn about this but this weeks reading was just unbelievable.  To say that enslaved people wanting to be free and run away, is a disease is ridiculous.  It’s always amusing to hear the ways that people would try and make slavery seem okay.  You can’t just come up with a “disease” to describe a behavior that you don’t support.  Part of me wants to believe that this was just lack of education on their part and truly not understanding how actual diseases and mental illnesses work, but in reality it is probably just ignorance and racism.

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Cartwright Reading

I have to rant about this a little bit, mostly because I am going into the (and currently am in) the healthcare field. The reading, for those who did it, details illnesses that are unique to negros, which includes the want/need to run away. I think this is ridiculous, and it just goes to show how FAR people were willing to go to justify that what they were doing was good and right. Cognitive dissonance is the psychology term used to describe anything that we find unpleasant. Say you don’t like broccoli. But you have to eat it every day. Eventually, because you are so upset about having to eat broccoli your brain will tell you hey, actually, you love broccoli! I think the same applies to slavery. There is NO WAY that people really, truly believed they were being humane. I think that they knew it was wrong, but were selfish, and the dissonance led them to believe anything that might possibly make what they were doing ok in their minds. Not that that’s any excuse, but to think that wanting to run away from slavery was an illness is absurd!

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Women In America

I found this weeks readings to be very interesting about women abolitionists in America and how they had set the foundation for womens rights later on down the line.  The way that we live in today’s society, I think we sometimes forget to look back at how women were treated throughout history and realize that they are the reason we are treated equally now.  Everything that we are able to do today is because these women were brave enough to stand up for themselves and all women to eventually be able to do all the things that were once only for men.

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The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears

This is going to be extremely opinionated, so please beware. Never have I ever been so irritated that I had to put a book down and stop reading. The amount of loathing that I have for the state of Georgia is unreal. I would say that I can’t believe that the human race could conceive such bigotry and idiocy but that would be a lie. The treatment of the Native Americans in the early 1800’s defied common sense. I have no idea where the idea that Europeans were ‘civilized’ came from, but I have high suspicions that the attitude had something to do with the fact that Europe was compromised of primarily monarchies. Such self-important attitudes and feelings of superiority are to me, horrible, and probably American citizen’s way of trying to mirror the importance of monarchy after escaping it. Georgians acted like children: spoiled children. And they were never punished for it. Every sentence I read in this book I just go more and more insane. We criticize our government now, but look what it was doing in the 1800’s! The novel even mentions that THE MAJORITY of Americans did not support removal (even if their reasons were skewed). Why is it that the government can proceed with things that the people don’t want? How is that a democracy? It drives me crazy (then, and now!) that the majority is not represented at all within our government.

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Round vs. Flat

So since it was Columbus day yesterday, there are a lot of history articles floating around about Christopher Columbus.  This one I found was explaining how the legend of Columbus “proving” the earth was round and not flat is just not true.  Historians say that there was no way that around that time, people thought the earth was flat.  It had been known for years that the earth was round.  I just thought it was funny that even that far back in history, people still made up false legends that still come up in today’s current situations.

http://www.history.com/news/christopher-columbus-never-set-out-to-prove-the-earth-was-round

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Indigenous People’s Day

Several states have adopted ‘Indigenous People’s Day’ in place of Columbus Day in an attempt to celebrate Native American contributions over the violent atrocities of Columbus, according to the article I read. I think this is a great idea, as far as school needing to teach more about Native American peoples, but I don’t think that it has to overshadow Columbus Day. Why not both?

Yes, it is common knowledge that Columbus and his colonists committed atrocities against the Native Americans, but that IS our past. Of course it’s not something to celebrate, but it is our founding. Why can’t we recognize our violent past and pay homage to the native peoples at the same time? I don’t think that attempts to hide our vicious past and honor the victims does much except help us forget the things that we as a nation are ashamed of. It’s important to remember where we’ve come from, and how we’ve changed. On that note, I do believe that indigenous people should be a larger part of American history curriculum, just as I believe that Columbus Day and Indigenous People’s Day could be one in the same.

http://www.history.com/news/goodbye-columbus-hello-indigenous-peoples-day

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Transcontinental Railroad

The transcontinental railroad was a big step in the industrial revolution.  This railroad also known as the Pacific Railroad is what first connected the east United States to the west.  Before the railroad was built, people had to travel either by wagon or even by boat to travel across the United States.  The railroad provided a safe way for traveling.  This also played a big role in expanding the US and allowing for settling in the West.  It’s interesting to look back at history and see how something that we see as easy nowadays (traveling), first begin.

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Confederate Statues Continued

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the tearing down of confederate statues. While my ideas on the issues have changed a bit, what is happening now I find completely unacceptable and disrespectful. Apparently, activists are now raiding cemeteries and defacing statues on graves of confederate soldiers. I find this appalling, disrespectful to the families of these soldiers and the soldiers themselves. I don’t think that this is acceptable in any fashion, but a thought occurred to me that stumped me. At what point does a grave stop being a grave or historical landmark and begin to be acceptable for archaeologists the like to explore? What makes it okay to remove grave goods and put them into museums? I don’t think that violence is the answer by any means, and I do think that what the activists are doing now is going too far, but they aren’t doing any more or less than humans have been doing for centuries.

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American Character: Reconciling Excellence and Consent

In this reading I  was very interested in how Alexis de Tocqueville saw the character of the American people.  It seemed that he liked that people acted as individuals but saw that as a little bit of an issue when it came to trying to reconcile excellence and consent within the government.  Overall he seemed to admire people of America even though they did embrace slavery and mistreated Native Americans.

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